Tag Archives: Jobs

Address – Just Jot It January

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Address – Just Jot It January

#JusJoJan Daily Prompt – January 26th, 2018

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Your prompt for January 26th, 2018, brought to you by my fellow old-commercial enthusiast, John Holton, is “Address.” Use it any way you’d like in your post. And make sure you visit John at his blog, “The Sound of One Hand Typing,” to read his post and say hi! Here’s his link:  https://thesoundofonehandtyping.wordpress.com/

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There were a couple of jobs I had back in the 1960s, in which I got to use lots of office machines. One of those machines was the address-o-graph.

It was used to stamp addresses of people and business places onto envelopes. There were small, rectangular metal plates having the addresses embossed into the metal.  I would load these into the machine, put in a stack of envelopes, and then operate the machine. As each one was done, the metal plate would go to the next one, and a new envelope would be ready to stamp.

We did hundreds of these for mass mailings, and the machine made it much easier and faster than handwriting all those addresses. It was fun to use the machine, too.

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Thanks for visiting! Peace ☮️

© 2018 BS

RANDOM POST # 13 – BAA-BAA SHEEP

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RANDOM POST # 13 – BAA-BAA SHEEP

I think this is the last former job I’ll post about, unless I remember another one I’ve had. I had a lot of fun with this job.

I read an ad in the local paper, asking for people who like to sew. Well sure, I like to sew, so I called the number. This lady answered. She lived in a tiny town next to ours, and wanted me to come over to see what she had in mind. I went, and found she had a small craft store next to her house. At first she wanted me to take some fabric and a pattern home to make a skirt. I guess this was a trial of sorts, to see how I sewed. I made the skirt, then brought it back. Well, after that she suggested I could sew … sheep muzzles! Huh?

Well, I never knew sheep wore muzzles, but I found out they do. She gave me yards and yards of that soft plastic shade cloth, a little pattern, some elastic, and some of her labels. I took it all home and got started.

This lady and her family raised sheep, and took them to shows at fairs around the area, hoping to win ribbons. They put the muzzles on the sheep so they wouldn’t chew up everything in sight, which they do, just like goats.

Anyway, she said she’d pay me a dollar for each one I made, and there was really no time limit, or quota, so I just worked on them as I wanted to. When I got a hundred made, I’d call her up, and meet her here in town, so I could give her the finished muzzles, and she would pay me. It worked out great.

She also wanted me to sew blankets for the sheep to wear in between showing them, to keep them warm, as these sheep were sheared. The blankets were pretty big, but easy to make. I think she paid me more for these, but can’t remember how much more.

At our local fair that year, we toured the sheep barn, and I did see her sheep wearing the muzzles and blankets that I sewed. Pretty cool!

I did this job for quite awhile, then I guess she had enough muzzles (she also sold them), and the job was over. I had fun doing this! Here’s a photo of one I made, but it is unfinished, and a couple of photos of a finished one and a blanket. I found these last two photos different places, by looking online.

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Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017 BS

RANDOM POST # 11 – SCHOOL DAZE

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RANDOM POST # 11 – SCHOOL DAZE

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Continuing my list of former jobs, these two were at schools. One was paid, one was not. Guess which one I liked the best. 🙂

I don’t remember which one came first, but they were both in elementary schools, in the late 80s, early 90s. Both of them were in Texas.

The one I got a paycheck from was at Willow Springs Elementary School. I was a teacher’s aid. I’ve never been to school for learning how to teach, so this was just to help out the teachers in the classroom. I had two that I rotated between. One was for pre-kindergarten, the other was 2nd grade.

Some of the duties I had during the day, was to create cute bulletin boards. They were to emphasize whatever the kids were learning about that week. I loved doing these. I also got to help the kids with craft projects, helping them learn to use little scissors, to cut out shapes, and also using glue. One project was gluing those goldfish cheese crackers onto some construction paper to make a fish bowl or something. The thing was, the kids kept eating all the crackers before they could glue any on. That was funny. I got to ask each one about letters, numbers, and colors, to see if they’d learned them yet. In the other 2nd grade class, I got to read stories to them from books. I’d get to take them outside for recess, and supervise the games. Also about once a week I had morning duty on the playground, so had to come in early before school started for that. All this was fun, and the kids were wonderful. 🙂

Then, there was cafeteria duty. Oh, how I hated that part. For some reason the school had strict no talking rules. I mean strict! There would be no talking at all from the kids while they ate their lunches. If one was even suspected of talking to anyone, they were singled out to go stand in front of the room, not finish their lunch, and no playground time after lunch. To me, that seemed horrible! Lunch should be a time to relax, with no stress, for the kids. Quiet talking to their neighboring kids would be fine to me, but this was not allowed. I just hated having to make one get up when they forgot.

Another thing I didn’t like about this place and job was that the faculty of teachers were not nice or friendly at all to me. They were all snooty. They wouldn’t talk in the break room, and looked at me like I was so much beneath them. Finally, I’d had enough, and quit this job.

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This other school job I had was a volunteer position. I worked in the school library. I actually can’t remember where this was. I think it may have been in Sinton TX. I sure did enjoy this job. I got to shelve books, and also get new books ready to be checked out, by classifying them, stamping the catalog numbers on them, and helping kids check out books when they came in. I don’t have anything bad to say about this one. The librarian was super nice, and helpful, and even sent me a nice letter after we had to move away, thanking me for working there.

So, these were two different experiences in school jobs I had. Yes, I liked the unpaid job best!

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Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017 BS

 

 

RANDOM POST # 10 – DIRTY LAUNDRY

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RANDOM POST # 10 – DIRTY LAUNDRY

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Well, here I am again with the continuing list of jobs I’ve had in the past.

This one was at a laundry service company called “National Linen Service”. It was here in town, and was in the 70s.

My job was in the office, processing invoices, using a calculator to add up totals, things like that. In the back was where they did the massive amounts of laundry, both private, and commercial. There were huge machines that washed, dried, and ironed all kinds of linens, like sheets. Well, I can’t remember what all they did, but I would think hospitals, hotels/motels, restaurants, and all would send in their dirty laundry to be done. I didn’t go back there often.

I worked there awhile, and kept getting into trouble. It wasn’t my fault, I promise! Week after week, when the totals on the invoices would not balance, or come out right, I’d get blamed. Finally, they had the calculator (it was a huge one, not a small hand-held one) checked out. Turns out something was askew in the innards of the thing, so it wouldn’t add/subtract right at all. So, they got it fixed or got another machine, I don’t remember. What I do remember is I got no apology, whatsoever, about it.

I never did get fired from this job, but I did just up and quit. Well, I never told them I was quitting, either. I just never showed up again. In fact, my husband, another couple, and I all went down to Juarez Mexico for a vacation. We had a wonderful time. When we got back, I think I got a letter or phone call, not sure which, from the company asking for their key back. I think it was a key to the desk drawer? After awhile, I finally took it back, but I made them wait for it. Still no thank you or apologies. Oh well…

The only other thing I remember about this job was that it was around Easter time, and everyone at work was eating chocolate candy rabbits. I ate so many of them I never wanted to eat one ever again!

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Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017 BS

*photo found on Pixabay

 

RANDOM POST # 9 – IRONING OUT THE WRINKLES

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RANDOM POST # 9 – IRONING OUT THE WRINKLES

Continuing the random jobs I’ve had in the past, I will tell you about ironing. I actually wrote this post a few years ago for an A to Z Challenge. 🙂

IRONING

I love to iron. I can hear the gasps now. Ironing is not usually a favorite chore, these days. You might say, why iron, when there are clothes dryers and no-iron fabrics. That is true, but some garments look much better when ironed smooth, or with a crisp crease.

My very first paying job was ironing for people. This was very early on, I wasn’t even a teenager yet, when I began. The fee I charged was 50 cents per dozen items. I raised the fee later on to 75 cents.

I’d started out learning to iron, by doing handkerchiefs and pillow cases, at home. Then, a lady my mom knew, asked if I’d iron her clothes…and she’d pay me. Of course I said yes, and that was it. I could make my spending money doing something I loved to do.

Off and on through the years, I would advertise in the newspapers, on bulletin boards at laundromats, grocery stores and hospitals. My last ironing jobs, the price I charged was one dollar per piece…so, if the person brought twelve items, I’d make twelve dollars. With several customers a week, I was doing pretty well for myself.

I can iron a dozen pieces in less than an hour, and do an excellent job. If you look at it one way, I was earning at least twelve dollars an hour.

I’ve ironed all kinds of clothes, such as heavily starched jeans and short shorts, everyday clothes, uniforms, scrubs, dress shirts and men’s suits. I’ve ironed for teachers, nurses, military, lawyers, judges, funeral directors, and regular work-a-day people. So many people hate to iron, there has never been a problem finding customers willing to pay someone else to do it for them.

Ironing is relaxing to me. The warmth and hiss of the steam iron is soothing. I can use the time to think of things to write about, or listen to music, meditate on problems, and even make a headache go away. So, if you don’t like to iron very much, instead of thinking of it as a dreaded chore, use the time as an island of serenity, a time to reflect, an interlude of peace and calm, to counteract all the really stressful tasks of your day…like doing the floors. I absolutely hate doing that!

Since I posted this a few years ago, I have stopped taking in ironing from the public. Guess you could say I’ve retired from the ironing board. 🙂

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Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017

 

 

RANDOM POST # 8 – AVON & RADIOS

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RANDOM POST # 8 – AVON & RADIOS

Continuing my list of the many jobs I’ve had in the past. I’ve forgotten exactly when I did these, so I won’t put any dates.

AVON

I tried selling Avon cosmetic products three different times over the years. I wasn’t  very good at it. These were all before on-line shopping and the internet, so I’d have to walk the sidewalks, knocking on doors. Seems it was always in the summer time, and so hot out, I’d be melting! I seem to remember they gave you a starter kit, or maybe we had to purchase one to get started. The first two times I don’t think we had a certain area (territory) assigned, so just went around my neighborhood. I’d leave the books, if no one was home when I knocked. If they answered the door, I’d try to get them to buy something. Most didn’t, but those that did, we’d put in the order, then pick up the order in a week, sort it all out into little bags, then have to go back to the people’s houses to deliver it, and collect the money. Ugh! It worked out sometimes, but other times I could never collect any money, they’d moved, or just changed their mind. That meant I didn’t get paid. I’d either have to pay for it myself, and keep it, or send it back. Can’t remember what I did. The whole deal was not fun. The last time, I did have an area, but it wasn’t any better. In fact, at one house, they invited me in, said they’d order something, but could I wait a few minutes…they were watching a basketball game and didn’t want to miss any of it. So, I waited it seemed forever, then I just left. That was it for me…no more selling Avon!

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This next one was a funny and fun job, if you can call it that. I did get paid a few dollars, so I say it was a job. Only lasted about a week.

I took part in an Arbitron Radio Ratings job. They sent a bunch of information, and a diary/log to keep of what we listened to, what station we listened to, and what times, and how long we listened to the radio during this ratings period. It was fun because I listened to a lot of different radio programs at the time, and hey, they were going to pay me! 🙂

I’ve actually done this two or three different times (I think once they get your name, they keep asking again) and it was fun every time. I was also paid for reviewing a very short video tape of a new sit-com TV show, and give them a review of it. Another time, my dad and I did a Nielsen’s Rating diary for TV shows.

Here’s some of the info they sent:

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Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017 BS

 

RANDOM POST # 7 – MANNEQUINS, STAMPS, & TUPPERWARE ?

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RANDOM POST # 7 – MANNEQUINS, STAMPS, & TUPPERWARE ?

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I’m continuing with my random posts about the jobs I’ve had in the past.

These three jobs I had were in about the same time period, in the mid 1970s. It was after we came back from Germany, and before we had any kids.

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One fun job I had was at Sears Department Store. I think this may have been in Paris, TX. I got to dress the mannequins for display on the sales floor. I could pick out what clothes to use, but had to be mindful of what was being featured and advertised at the time. It was always changing from week to week. I wasn’t there for very long, because we moved to another city.

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This next one was I believe in Greenville, TX. It was at the S & H Green Stamps Redemption Center. Do you remember those savings stamps? You’d be given a certain amount of them at the grocery store, according to how much money you had spent. The stamps in this case were green. You’d take them home to paste into a savings book, which were given out at the store, also. Later, when you saved a bunch, you could take the booklets to the redemption center to trade them in for cool items. They had a catalog, too, that you could look through, and decide if you had enough stamps for what you wanted.

I worked at the redemption center store, where all the merchandise was kept. There was a counter, a showroom, and a warehouse part. I worked at the counter, and count we did. A lot of that, as we had to flip through each booklet a person brought in, to make sure they had filled it out completely, and if they had enough to purchase the item they’d chosen. It was a fun job, and the people I worked with were fun. One funny thing was I learned what a ‘finger cot’ was. Strange name, but a very useful item. It was a little rubber thing to put on your thumb or finger, to make turning those booklet pages faster. You could get a good grip on the pages. 🙂

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This next job was at a Tupperware distributor place. It was here in this town. I worked in the office, processing invoices/orders, that the Tupperware dealers would submit. Each Monday, if I remember, all the dealers in our district would come in for a sort of get-together/pep-rally thing. They’d have their meeting, refreshments, and also turn in their orders, and pick up orders from the last week. I used the calculator a lot, and also did typing. and filing. I got to type up the mimeographed templates, for the newsletter, and then go run them all off on the mimeograph machine. We didn’t at that time have a copy machine. It was old school, I guess you’d say. It was messy work with the inks and all, but I liked doing it. Later, I’d address all the envelopes with the adressograph machine. I worked at this place for quite a while, then was let go. They ‘said’ it was because they were going more automatic in the office, or something, but I know why. I was pregnant. Pretty sure that wouldn’t happen in this day and age!

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Stay tuned for more random posts about the many jobs I’ve had in the past. 🙂

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Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017 BS

 

 

 

RANDOM POST # 6 – MAY I HELP YOU?

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RANDOM POST # 6 – MAY I HELP YOU?

Sandy’s Restaurant Logo (on an original napkin)

photo found on Pixabay by Metsi

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Here’s the short, sad saga of my foray into the world of fast-food jobs. It was in the early 1970s, in Lawton OK, when I needed another job. I applied at McDonald’s and got hired right away to be a cashier. I had a uniform and everything. The day of my interview I specifically mentioned our plans of going out of town for Thanksgiving. I was told there would be no problem with that. I began work, and all was good. The job was just right for a part time job for me, and I enjoyed it. A week later, as the holiday approached, I mentioned that I would not be there for a couple of days, as we still had our going out of town plans. I was assured that this was fine with them, come back when we got back in town. So, off we went. On our return, I went in to my regular job schedule, only to be told I had no job after all. What? How could this be? Now what was I going to do? I really needed a job to earn some money.

I was in a state…what do I do now? I went on down the road to another fast-food restaurant to put in my application. This place was called Sandy’s. It was a lot like McDonald’s, but better. The menu was more interesting, and very good. I was hired immediately, so I didn’t have to come home with no job to my name. I worked at Sandy’s for quite a long time, until we moved to Germany. The boss, and the other employees were very nice and fun to work with. I was a cashier there, too. When a customer would come into the restaurant, we were all to say, with enthusiasm, “May I help you?” We loved doing that, and we’d make it into a contest to see which register station the customer would choose. As it was winter, we had some snowy days, and those days brought in the most customers, it seemed. I had a lot of fun working there. Later on, when we were back stateside, and were stationed at Ft. Sill, again, I was disappointed to learn that Sandy’s restaurant was no longer there. I found out it had been merged/taken over by a Hardee’s restaurant.

Even today I miss the food from the Sandy’s menu, and wish I had some more. They had a large burger called the Big Scott. It was similar to the Big Mac, but had shredded cabbage, and a sweet relish sauce that was oh so good. There was the hi-lo double cheeseburger, and a deep fried pork tenderloin on a bun, that was a favorite of mine.

Do any of you remember having a Sandy’s restaurant where you lived? 🙂

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Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017 BS

 

RANDOM POST # 5 – LIGHT IT UP

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RANDOM POST # 5 – LIGHT IT UP

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photo found on Pixabay (bfleeson)

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photo found on Pixabay (Tyler Vigen)

Sticking with the Random Post’s of some of the many jobs I’ve had over the years, here are two more. These were in the early 70s, in our home town.

First, was at Litton Industries. They made things for the Defense Department, along with other useful items, such as micro-waves, and calculators. My job there was to make wiring harnesses. These would go into airplanes or other government goods. I would get a blueprint/diagram of the harness to be made, choose the right wires, measure, cut, and strip the ends. Then I’d put them together as required in bundles, and in order, to make them fit the printed out diagram. At some point, I’d get to attach the wires to parts of the motherboard, and solder diodes and transistors to the board. It was fun to do all this, and didn’t seem complicated at all. The other workers were mostly women, and we’d sit at a long table while we worked, and we could talk about all kinds of things. The photos are very similar to what we did on this job.

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photo found on Pixabay (OpenClipart Vectors)

Next, was Texas Instruments. This is a well-known company for electronics. The area I worked in was called, ‘Light-Up’. We were testing the little pieces of plastic material that goes into calculators. These were the little numbers that show up on the calculator screen when you turn it on. We had to make sure each little piece would actually show up each of the 7 segments of the numbers. We had a simple manual machine that we’d put the number into, pull down the door of the machine, and it would light up the number. If it was good, it went in one pile, if not it went into the bad pile. We were encouraged to do this as fast as we could, and I think I got up to lighting up over a hundred every minute. It was easy and fun to try to beat your score each time. We also got to talk amongst ourselves while we worked, too. Did you know the numbers are all like those in the photo, inside a calculator? Only certain parts are lit up on the screen to form the number you punch in.

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Hope you enjoyed hearing about these jobs. I’ll post more soon, as I’ve had lots more jobs, all different and interesting. 🙂

Thanks for visiting! Peace }i{

© 2017 BS

RANDOM POST # 4 – CURTAIN JOB

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RANDOM POST # 4 – CURTAIN JOB

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Well, here I am again with a random post. I’d started doing these way back in September, then got sidetracked with other things.

This one is getting back to telling about the many jobs I’ve had in the past. I’m not even sure of the order, but this one is from when we lived in Lawton, OK.

It was at a mobile home manufacturing plant. The name of the company was “Town & Country Mobile Home Mfg. Co.”, and they built mobile homes as they say, from the ground up…from nothing but materials, to finished and for sale mobile homes.

My job was at the very end of the production line. I got to do a bit of decorating. I think my job title was probably ‘curtain hanger’. First I would have to take long, lightweight pipes, measure and cut them, and put the finishing ends onto them. These were curtain rods for the mobile homes. After doing the pipe cutting, I’d go into the home to hang them up on all the windows. I also hung up shower curtains. It was a fun job. While I was doing that, there were others in there doing some cleaning up of any dust and debris left from the making of the home. For some reason they would use this cleaning substance that smelled really good to me. I asked what it was, and they told me it was Naptha. I didn’t know what that was, but now I’ve looked it up. Seems, it is used as a cleaning fluid, among other uses, such as soap making. However, it is a petroleum product, and can be dangerous and flammable.

Anyway, at Christmas time the company gave everyone a big turkey to take home. 🙂

I don’t know why I left that job, but probably because we moved again, as being with the U.S Army, we moved a lot.

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Photo found on Pixabay

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Thanks for visiting! Peace

© 2017 BS