Monkey Blood – Stream of Consciousness Saturday SOCS – Mon

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Monkey Blood – Stream of Consciousness Saturday SOCS – Mon

The Friday Reminder and Prompt for #SoCS April 14/18

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Today for SOCS our fearless leader, Linda, has asked us to write something with the letters ‘mon’ as part of a word, or not. Thanks, Linda!

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There are so many words starting with ‘mon’, or have ‘mon’ in the word, that I was all over the place trying to settle on something. So here goes…

I don’t like monkeys of any kind, but I kept coming back to monkey as the subject.

Monkey Blood. Have you ever heard of that? It’s what we used to call the antiseptic liquid Mercurochrome. When we were kids, anytime we had a scrape or small cut, we’d get the monkey blood treatment. It came in a small, dark bottle, with an applicator. Mom would paint it on us. Oh, it was bright red in color. I don’t know how it came to be called monkey blood, but maybe it was to make us laugh instead of cry. I kind of remember the stuff would sting a bit. Every time you’d see another kid, we could compare our monkey blood paintings.

I guess it was an all purpose remedy. We’d also get our sore throats painted with monkey blood. Most times Grandma would come over, yank a stiff straw from the household broom, wrap a bit of cotton on one end, soak it in Mercurochrome, and tell us to open wide. She’d stick that straw to the back of our throat and paint it with the red stuff. We didn’t like that at all, but I supposed it helped. Our sore throat would go away pretty fast.

Another monkey thing…

There was a house down the road that we’d pass on the way to the grocery store. They owned a monkey. It was kept in a large cage hooked onto the back of the house. Every time we passed, we’d look for the monkey, and holler, “There’s the monkey!”

Well, enough about monkeys. There’s some more things I was going to say, but this is getting long. How did I wind up talking about monkeys, anyway? I don’t even like them!

Hope you’re having a fun Saturday, with or without monkeys! ๐Ÿ™‚

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Thanks for visiting! Peace โ˜ฎ๏ธ

ยฉ 2018 BS

18 responses »

      • just like the old thermometers. I remember if we broke one how the little balls of mercury would roll around. Or is that a dream???

      • Nope, not a dream. Thermometers did have Mercury in them (silver). This is probably bad, but us kids would on purpose break them to get the cool silver out. It did clump up in little balls. We’d play around with it, and put it on pennies and nickles to make them shiny. We didn’t know any better! haha

  1. I miss mercurochrome. What happened to it? It numbed cold sores and all manner of owies. Never called it monkey blood. Yep, my husband and I are sittin here like “What happened to it?”

    • I hadn’t thought of it in years. Looking it up I found it wasn’t banned because of the low amount of Mercury in it, but it was reclassified in the 90s. The FDA would have to run tests, and the company, I guess didn’t want to do that, so it pretty much faded away. Now, though you can still buy it at some places, but it’s been revamped with no Mercury in it.

    • We didn’t use Iodine, I don’t think. We kids just liked the red stain on our skin from the Mercurocrome, but I still think it would sting a bit. ๐Ÿ™‚ I like calling it Monkey Blood. I don’t know where that name came from. ๐Ÿ™‚

  2. Thanks for the great memory! Growing up as a rambunctious boy, scrapes, cuts, gashes, etc. were an everyday fact of life for me. Mom kept a bottle of Mercurochrome handy at all time for when I’d run into the house with my latest wound. She’d douse it liberally with Mercurochrome and send me back outside to play. I liked Mercurochrome because it made an ordinary wound look much worse than it was, since it looked like dried blood.

    Ah, good times!

    • haha! I can just imagine, because we were the same way. When we’d get a scrape or something, out would come the Monkey Blood. Yes, if it looked worse with the red painted on, we could brag about how we got hurt, and lived to tell all the other kids. ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for sharing your memory, too!

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